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Okinawa Association of America volunteers are working hard to make our kazari for the 2014 Los Angeles Tanabata Festival! We can’t wait to show you the final result… :)

Okinawa Association of America volunteers are working hard to make our kazari for the 2014 Los Angeles Tanabata Festival! We can’t wait to show you the final result… :)

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breerun:

queennubian:

preach Jada!

ME IN EVERY SINGLE MOVIE LATELY

(Source: lohan, via pekopekopompom)

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politicalsexkitten:

yukaryote:

Why Guys Like Asian Girls - Anna Akana

Everyone needs to watch this video. Now.

100% on point especially about men thinking that having “yellow fever” is a compliment and we’re supposed to be flattered by it. It’s the #1 way to parade around your blatant racism.

(via fucknofetishization)

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papershopprojects:

NEW VIDEO: OKINAWAN BON DANCERS @ THE 2012 NISEI WEEK GRAND PARADE!

60+ volunteers represented the Okinawa Association of America (OAA) in this year’s Nisei Week Parade! Approx. 36 of them wore kasuri pattern kimonos and danced to choreographed Okinawan and Japanese Bon-Odori!

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Producer’s Note: This video pieces together footage from the OAA’s full parade route circling Little Tokyo (Downtown Los Angeles, California). Since the dancers had to repeat the same 2 songs for the entire duration of the parade, I was able to film each dance from various angles. In the end, 40+ minutes of video has been condensed into two 3-minute montages (2nd video coming soon).

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- choreographed by Miyagi Nosho and Keiko Yonamine
- filmed and edited by Joseph Yoshimasu Kamiya
- filmed on August 12, 2012 in Little Tokyo [Downtown Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.]
- music: 島や若夏 [Shima ya Wakanatsu]
- ippei nifwee deebiru [thank you very much]: OAA volunteers, the Geinobu (Performing Arts Committee), and the Nisei Week Foundation

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The Okinawa Association of America, Inc. (OAA) is a 501c(3) nonprofit corporation. Its mission is to promote the Okinawan culture, to assist social and educational advancement of the members, and to contribute to local and international cultural exchanges. Currently about 700 families and individuals belong to the Association! To learn more about the OAA and to become a member, please visit our website or “like” us on Facebook!

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Who were the Nisei? First general chairman of Nisei Week was Clarence Arima, his co-chairman was Kay Sugahara. Arima was the Nisei manager of the Issei-owned Union Paper Supply Co. Sugahara was owner of Universal Foreign Service, a customs brokerage firm. Names in the first Nisei Week program identify the nucleus of the organizing team: Seiichi Nobe, John Ando, Tetsu Ishimaru, John Maeno, Sue Ando, Ruby Sakai, Etsu Sato, Msao Igasaki, Yogoro Takeyama, John Yahiro. They were more than 10 years older than most Nisei. Established in their vocations, they were a Little Tokyo Nisei leadership group. John Maeno, who became chairman of the third Nisei Week, wrote in his program: “The Nisei is a new American. Racially of the Orient, he is true and loyal citizen of the United States, his native land. Young, ambitious, hopeful, though at times oppressed, he seeks to take his place in civic development and community progress.” This J.A.C.L. message became a fixture. It was interspersed with the commercial marketing thrust of Issei shopkeepers. Nisei Week became an instrument not only to revive and revitalize Little Tokyo’s economic base, but to expose the non-Japanese audience out there to the Nisei’s message that the successors to the Issei were a generation of Americans. For more information, please visit our website or “like” us on Facebook!

Every other year, the Okinawa Association of America (OAA) participates in the Nisei Week Foundation’s Grand Parade in Little Tokyo. We’re participating this year, but we need more dancers! We’ll be holding a practice this coming Sunday, July 27, at the OAA Center (around 3:00 PM): http://www.facebook.com/events/682530531835124

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Raising funds for the prestigious Armed With a Camera Fellowship, Class of 2015

In its nearly 45-year history, Visual Communications has played a key role in the development of Asian Pacific American cinema. We were the first APA filmmaker’s organization, founded in 1970, and we produced among the first films to articulate the experiences of APAs. And we have played a key role in training and promoting the next generation of APA filmmakers through initiatives as Project Catalyst, the Conference for Creative Content (C3) and The Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival.

But there is one thing we haven’t done… until NOW. And YOU can help us make it a rousing success.

JOIN US as Visual Communications launches its first-ever crowdsourcing campaign to support the Armed With a Camera Fellowship for Emerging Media Artists (AWC)!
Since 2002, Visual Communications’ Armed With a Camera Fellowship for Emerging Media Artists has nurtured a new generation of Asian Pacific Americans to articulate their experiences and perspectives through the powerful medium of film. Along the way, we’ve seen AWC productions inspire newer generations of artists to pick up a motion picture camera and make their own movies, and additionally be showcased at festivals, community screenings, and online venues all over the world:
Twelve fellowship cycles, yielding a crop of nearly 100 digital films.
Starting with Ernesto Foronda (AWC ‘02), nearly one out of every five AWC Fellows has gone on to direct and/or produce a feature-length narrative or documentary film.
Not only have AWC productions been showcased at our LA Asian Pacific Film Festival, but also at other film festivals in San Francisco, San Diego, New York City, Boston, Chicago, Washington DC, and have even been showcased at international venues as the Cinemanila International Film Festival in Manila.  This year’s Fellows even saw one of their AWC films be a finalist for the Student Academy Awards (Rahat Mahajan’s RESIGNATION).
And finally, AWC productions have promoted the economic and resourceful ethos of the Fellowship, and have encouraged “outside-the-box” thinking in how Fellows imagine, create, and produce media.
Now, on the cusp of the Fellowship’s Lucky 13th season, we’re appealing to YOU to insure that this ground-breaking community institution continues to inspire and equip tomorrow’s filmmaking masters.

Raising funds for the prestigious Armed With a Camera Fellowship, Class of 2015

In its nearly 45-year history, Visual Communications has played a key role in the development of Asian Pacific American cinema. We were the first APA filmmaker’s organization, founded in 1970, and we produced among the first films to articulate the experiences of APAs. And we have played a key role in training and promoting the next generation of APA filmmakers through initiatives as Project Catalyst, the Conference for Creative Content (C3) and The Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival.

But there is one thing we haven’t done… until NOW. And YOU can help us make it a rousing success.

JOIN US as Visual Communications launches its first-ever crowdsourcing campaign to support the Armed With a Camera Fellowship for Emerging Media Artists (AWC)!

Since 2002, Visual Communications’ Armed With a Camera Fellowship for Emerging Media Artists has nurtured a new generation of Asian Pacific Americans to articulate their experiences and perspectives through the powerful medium of film. Along the way, we’ve seen AWC productions inspire newer generations of artists to pick up a motion picture camera and make their own movies, and additionally be showcased at festivals, community screenings, and online venues all over the world:

  • Twelve fellowship cycles, yielding a crop of nearly 100 digital films.
  • Starting with Ernesto Foronda (AWC ‘02), nearly one out of every five AWC Fellows has gone on to direct and/or produce a feature-length narrative or documentary film.
  • Not only have AWC productions been showcased at our LA Asian Pacific Film Festival, but also at other film festivals in San Francisco, San Diego, New York City, Boston, Chicago, Washington DC, and have even been showcased at international venues as the Cinemanila International Film Festival in Manila.  This year’s Fellows even saw one of their AWC films be a finalist for the Student Academy Awards (Rahat Mahajan’s RESIGNATION).
  • And finally, AWC productions have promoted the economic and resourceful ethos of the Fellowship, and have encouraged “outside-the-box” thinking in how Fellows imagine, create, and produce media.

Now, on the cusp of the Fellowship’s Lucky 13th season, we’re appealing to YOU to insure that this ground-breaking community institution continues to inspire and equip tomorrow’s filmmaking masters.

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Tinsagu nu Hana song progress: Just passed the “sounds-so-terrible-that-I-wanna-throw-shit-across-the-room” level.

Tags: positivity
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The latest video message from the World Youth Uchinanchu Association (WYUA) in Okinawa, inviting participants to the 3rd Wakamono Taikai in Germany!

Click here for extended registration deadline and discounted fees: http://yuao.org/the-3rd-in-germany/conference-program

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