Photo
"Our job as musicians should be to celebrate the good and do something about fixing the bad. That’s why I hate the military bases here, but I love Americans." - Shoukichi Kina (pictured, courtesy of Itsuo Inouye/AP)
"The theme I really want to explore through my music is that no matter what happens, local people’s way of life must be protected." - Tatsumi Chibana
[via The Guardian]:
Okinawa’s musicians provide a focus for Japanese protest against US bases
With Barack Obama visiting Japan in April, resentment at plans for the US Futenma military base is finding a musical voice
Justin McCurry in Okinawatheguardian.com, Thursday 17 April 2014 10.50 EDT
If an island of 1.4m people can be summed up in a sound, it is that of the sanshin. Where there are people on Okinawa, a Japanese island almost 1,000 miles south of Tokyo, the distinctive tones of the three-stringed instrument are never far away.
Music is deeply rooted in Okinawa’s tragic place in Japan's history and the conduit for its modern grievances against the glut of US militarybases on the island. As Barack Obama prepares to visit Tokyo to meet Japan’s prime minister, Shinzo Abe, later in April, the anti-war message of sanshin players such as Shoukichi Kina and Misako Oshiro is back in vogue as the subtropical island confronts its biggest political challenge since it reverted from US to Japanese rule in the 1970s..
In his mid-60s, Kina cuts a controversial figure as spiritual leader of Okinawa’s activist musicians. Since the release of their first single Haisai Ojisan (Hey, Man!) in the 1970s, Kina and his band Champloose have done more than any other artists to secure Okinawan music against competition from mass-market Japanese J-pop and the more innocent musical motifs of the mainland folk genres minyo and enka.
"Our job as musicians should be to celebrate the good and do something about fixing the bad," said Kina, who some have called Okinawa’s answer to Bob Marley. "That’s why I hate the military bases here, but I love Americans."
Though it accounts for less than 1% of Japan’s total area, Okinawa is now home to about 75% of US bases in Japan and half its 50,000 troops. Military facilities take up a fifth of the island. Obama and Abe are expected to discuss the controversial relocation of Futenma, a sprawling US marine base, from a heavily populated part of Okinawa to an unspoiled location on the island’s northeast coast, as the allies attempt to lessen the island’s military burden. The move is opposed by most islanders, including the residents of Nago, whose city lies near the proposed site for the new base.
The spirit of resistance pioneered by Kina is to be found in the more eclectic music of Tatsumi Chibana, a quietly spoken 33-year-old university graduate and perhaps the most visible of Okinawa’s new generation of rebel artists, fusing traditional sounds with rock, reggae and hip-hop.
After a US military helicopter from the Futenma US marine base crashed into Okinawa International University in 2004, Chibana was moved to write his best-known song, Tami no Domino (People’s Domino), a collaboration between his band Duty Free Shopp and local rapper Kakumakushaka.
The incendiary lyrics reflect the feeling of many residents towards the ever-present threat to safety posed by the island’s 27,000 US troops and their hardware: “Surrounded by weapons in the land of disorder; what the hell can you tell me about peace in a place like this?”
Most of Chibana’s music eschews the sanshin and other traditional instruments, but his background looms large, he said. “I’m always aware of my Okinawan identity when I make music. OK, so I wasn’t brought up listening to folk songs, but the spirit of that old music is in mine. It doesn’t matter whether I play reggae, hip-hop or rock, it’s still Okinawan music.”
Despite appearances at concerts organised to protest against the Futenma relocation, Chibana is reluctant to be pigeonholed. “The base issue is huge, but my protests songs aren’t anti-base, so much as pro-community. I’m not interested in the ideological battles between left and right. The theme I really want to explore through my music is that no matter what happens, local people’s way of life must be protected.”
Like Kina, Chibana occasionally sings in the Okinawan language Uchinaguchi – an artistic choice that renders his lyrics unintelligible to many Japanese, but which exemplifies the island’s historical and emotional sense of detachment from the mainland.
In the 16th century, where the sanshin’s origins lie, Okinawa was part of the Ryukyu kingdom, which, while politically independent, had tributary relations with Ming dynasty China. Forced annexation by Japan came in the late 1800s, followed in the 1940s by the carnage of the Pacific war.
Less than a century after it was forcibly made part of Japan, Okinawa was the scene of one of the second world war’s bloodiest battles. An estimated 240,000 Japanese and Americans died, including more than a quarter of Okinawa’s civilian population, after US forces invaded in June 1945. Japanese troops distributed grenades to civilians, urging them to commit suicide or risk being raped and murdered by American soldiers.
"There are lots of songs about how terribly the Okinawans were treated in the war," said John Potter, the author of the only English-language book on Okinawan music and a prolific blogger on the subject.
Okinawa’s return to Japan in 1972 – almost three decades after the war – fuelled the local sense of “otherness” from the mainland.
Not all Okinawan musicians draw inspiration from the island’s bloody past, Potter said. “Many songs come back to what a fantastic place Okinawa is. Lots of artists sing about their culture and being island people, and their pride in being different.”
Poverty – Okinawa is Japan’s poorest prefecture – and the looming clouds of conflict sent many people in search of new lives overseas, creating a diaspora whose youngest members are making their presence felt on the island’s contemporary music scene.
Lucy Nagamine, a Peruvian-born singer whose grandparents left Okinawa shortly before the war, learned classical Ryukyu music from her grandmother and picked up her deceased grandfather’s sanshin at the age of 10.
Before settling in her ancestral homeland several years ago, Lucy often sang for Okinawan immigrants in Peru who were desperate to preserve the emotional ties with home. “Now I’m here in Okinawa, away from the country of my birth, I know how my grandparents and other immigrants felt,” she said in between songs at her regular venue, a restaurant in Naha.
"In those days immigrants had nothing to do except sing and play the sanshin. It was a central part of their existence, and why music and the Okinawan lifestyle are closely intertwined, even today."
Less polemic are Nenes, a group of four whose lineup has gone through several reincarnations since they were formed by the legendary artist and producer Sadao China in 1990. Nenes perform classic Okinawan songs for groups of tourists from the mainland.
One rare departure from their otherwise “safe” repertoire is their stirring version of Keisuke Kuwata’s Heiwa no Kyuka, which simmers with resentment over Okinawa’s bloody wartime sacrifice. “Who decided this country was at peace,” the song asks, “Even before the people’s tears have dried?”
"Now that we’re confronting the base issue again, this is a good time to sing about peace," said 24-year-old Mayuko Higa. "It’s important that the people who come to see us perform know why it’s an important subject here."
Nenes’ tourist-friendly melodies can seem a world away from Kina’s ceaseless quest for social and political change, an artist who implores the world’s armies to swap their weapons for musical instruments. His decade-old feud with NHK, Japan’s national broadcaster, proves that Japan’s mainstream media and firebrand politics can be uncomfortable bedfellows.
"They demanded that I drop any references to peace from my performance," Kina said, his arms in motion again as he recalls his incredulity. "I refused, of course, and they haven’t invited me back since. The message for Okinawan musicians has always been that if you want to get on in this industry, then keep your mouth shut. But I’ll say what I like."

"Our job as musicians should be to celebrate the good and do something about fixing the bad. That’s why I hate the military bases here, but I love Americans." - Shoukichi Kina (pictured, courtesy of Itsuo Inouye/AP)

"The theme I really want to explore through my music is that no matter what happens, local people’s way of life must be protected." - Tatsumi Chibana

[via The Guardian]:

Okinawa’s musicians provide a focus for Japanese protest against US bases

With Barack Obama visiting Japan in April, resentment at plans for the US Futenma military base is finding a musical voice

Justin McCurry in Okinawa
theguardian.com, Thursday 17 April 2014 10.50 EDT


If an island of 1.4m people can be summed up in a sound, it is that of the
 sanshin. Where there are people on Okinawa, a Japanese island almost 1,000 miles south of Tokyo, the distinctive tones of the three-stringed instrument are never far away.

Music is deeply rooted in Okinawa’s tragic place in Japan's history and the conduit for its modern grievances against the glut of US militarybases on the island. As Barack Obama prepares to visit Tokyo to meet Japan’s prime minister, Shinzo Abe, later in April, the anti-war message of sanshin players such as Shoukichi Kina and Misako Oshiro is back in vogue as the subtropical island confronts its biggest political challenge since it reverted from US to Japanese rule in the 1970s..

In his mid-60s, Kina cuts a controversial figure as spiritual leader of Okinawa’s activist musicians. Since the release of their first single Haisai Ojisan (Hey, Man!) in the 1970s, Kina and his band Champloose have done more than any other artists to secure Okinawan music against competition from mass-market Japanese J-pop and the more innocent musical motifs of the mainland folk genres minyo and enka.

"Our job as musicians should be to celebrate the good and do something about fixing the bad," said Kina, who some have called Okinawa’s answer to Bob Marley. "That’s why I hate the military bases here, but I love Americans."

Though it accounts for less than 1% of Japan’s total area, Okinawa is now home to about 75% of US bases in Japan and half its 50,000 troops. Military facilities take up a fifth of the island. Obama and Abe are expected to discuss the controversial relocation of Futenma, a sprawling US marine base, from a heavily populated part of Okinawa to an unspoiled location on the island’s northeast coast, as the allies attempt to lessen the island’s military burden. The move is opposed by most islanders, including the residents of Nago, whose city lies near the proposed site for the new base.

The spirit of resistance pioneered by Kina is to be found in the more eclectic music of Tatsumi Chibana, a quietly spoken 33-year-old university graduate and perhaps the most visible of Okinawa’s new generation of rebel artists, fusing traditional sounds with rock, reggae and hip-hop.

After a US military helicopter from the Futenma US marine base crashed into Okinawa International University in 2004, Chibana was moved to write his best-known song, Tami no Domino (People’s Domino), a collaboration between his band Duty Free Shopp and local rapper Kakumakushaka.

The incendiary lyrics reflect the feeling of many residents towards the ever-present threat to safety posed by the island’s 27,000 US troops and their hardware: “Surrounded by weapons in the land of disorder; what the hell can you tell me about peace in a place like this?”

Most of Chibana’s music eschews the sanshin and other traditional instruments, but his background looms large, he said. “I’m always aware of my Okinawan identity when I make music. OK, so I wasn’t brought up listening to folk songs, but the spirit of that old music is in mine. It doesn’t matter whether I play reggae, hip-hop or rock, it’s still Okinawan music.”

Despite appearances at concerts organised to protest against the Futenma relocation, Chibana is reluctant to be pigeonholed. “The base issue is huge, but my protests songs aren’t anti-base, so much as pro-community. I’m not interested in the ideological battles between left and right. The theme I really want to explore through my music is that no matter what happens, local people’s way of life must be protected.”

Like Kina, Chibana occasionally sings in the Okinawan language Uchinaguchi – an artistic choice that renders his lyrics unintelligible to many Japanese, but which exemplifies the island’s historical and emotional sense of detachment from the mainland.

In the 16th century, where the sanshin’s origins lie, Okinawa was part of the Ryukyu kingdom, which, while politically independent, had tributary relations with Ming dynasty China. Forced annexation by Japan came in the late 1800s, followed in the 1940s by the carnage of the Pacific war.

Less than a century after it was forcibly made part of Japan, Okinawa was the scene of one of the second world war’s bloodiest battles. An estimated 240,000 Japanese and Americans died, including more than a quarter of Okinawa’s civilian population, after US forces invaded in June 1945. Japanese troops distributed grenades to civilians, urging them to commit suicide or risk being raped and murdered by American soldiers.

"There are lots of songs about how terribly the Okinawans were treated in the war," said John Potter, the author of the only English-language book on Okinawan music and a prolific blogger on the subject.

Okinawa’s return to Japan in 1972 – almost three decades after the war – fuelled the local sense of “otherness” from the mainland.

Not all Okinawan musicians draw inspiration from the island’s bloody past, Potter said. “Many songs come back to what a fantastic place Okinawa is. Lots of artists sing about their culture and being island people, and their pride in being different.”

Poverty – Okinawa is Japan’s poorest prefecture – and the looming clouds of conflict sent many people in search of new lives overseas, creating a diaspora whose youngest members are making their presence felt on the island’s contemporary music scene.

Lucy Nagamine, a Peruvian-born singer whose grandparents left Okinawa shortly before the war, learned classical Ryukyu music from her grandmother and picked up her deceased grandfather’s sanshin at the age of 10.

Before settling in her ancestral homeland several years ago, Lucy often sang for Okinawan immigrants in Peru who were desperate to preserve the emotional ties with home. “Now I’m here in Okinawa, away from the country of my birth, I know how my grandparents and other immigrants felt,” she said in between songs at her regular venue, a restaurant in Naha.

"In those days immigrants had nothing to do except sing and play the sanshin. It was a central part of their existence, and why music and the Okinawan lifestyle are closely intertwined, even today."

Less polemic are Nenes, a group of four whose lineup has gone through several reincarnations since they were formed by the legendary artist and producer Sadao China in 1990. Nenes perform classic Okinawan songs for groups of tourists from the mainland.

One rare departure from their otherwise “safe” repertoire is their stirring version of Keisuke Kuwata’s Heiwa no Kyuka, which simmers with resentment over Okinawa’s bloody wartime sacrifice. “Who decided this country was at peace,” the song asks, “Even before the people’s tears have dried?”

"Now that we’re confronting the base issue again, this is a good time to sing about peace," said 24-year-old Mayuko Higa. "It’s important that the people who come to see us perform know why it’s an important subject here."

Nenes’ tourist-friendly melodies can seem a world away from Kina’s ceaseless quest for social and political change, an artist who implores the world’s armies to swap their weapons for musical instruments. His decade-old feud with NHK, Japan’s national broadcaster, proves that Japan’s mainstream media and firebrand politics can be uncomfortable bedfellows.

"They demanded that I drop any references to peace from my performance," Kina said, his arms in motion again as he recalls his incredulity. "I refused, of course, and they haven’t invited me back since. The message for Okinawan musicians has always been that if you want to get on in this industry, then keep your mouth shut. But I’ll say what I like."

Photo
Congratulations to Keiko Yonamine Reich, a local master/shihan and instructor of traditional Ryukyu dance, who has been honored as one of the Downtown JACL’s Women of the Year 2014!
Photo by Yukikazu Nagashima, Okinawa Association of America in Gardena, California
BIOGRAPHY [via Rafu Shimpo]:

Keiko Yonamine Reich, the headmaster of the Kansenkai, was born on July 27, 1944, in Kin-Cho, Okinawa. In 1963, she graduated from Ginoza High School, where she was on the basketball team. After graduation, she worked as a bookkeeper in a restaurant business.
In 1972, Reich began to learn Okinawan dance from Grandmaster Iemoto Shizu Ikehara, head of the Tamagusuku-Ryu Kansenkai (formerly named Gyokusenkai). Reich participated in Ikehara’s dance recitals and at various community events as a way to develop and promote Kansenkai.
In 1982, Reich enrolled at the Kyoto Kimono Gakuin, where she earned her first- and second-class teacher’s licenses and became a teacher’s assistant.
In December of 1984, Reich’s military husband was transferred to the United States, so her family moved to Oceanside, where she opened her first dance studio. At her students’ request, Reich opened a second studio in Orange County and a third studio in Tuscon, Ariz.
In 1984, Reich became a member of the Okinawan Association of America and of Geinobu. At this time, she also began to participate in numerous events at UC San Diego, CSU Sacramento, Logan University in Utah, Washington State University, the Norris Theater’s Japanese Festival, the Morikami Garden Japanese Cultural Festival in Florida, the Hawaiian Okinawan Festival, and so on. Through her participation in these various events, she was able to introduce the Okinawan culture to many places by collaborating with local dance teachers and performing in their dance recitals.
In 1987, Reich became one of the founding members of the Geinobu Performing Arts. From 1998 to 1999, she served as Geinobu’s chairperson, and she is currently the group’s advisor.
In 1990, Reich received her teacher’s license from Iemoto Ikehara. In 2004, she received her shihan master’s license.
In 1992, she invited her iemoto from Okinawa to her first performance, “Furusato e no Hitotoki,” at the Ebell Theatre in Los Angeles. In September of 1997, she performed at the first Kansenkai Charity Show in Oceanside for San Diego Children’s Hospital. In October of 1997, she performed at the second Kansenkai Charity Show at the Orange County Church for Orange County Children’s Hospital. In August of 2010, Kansenkai performed in a charity show at Oceanside.
Reich donated all of her proceeds to Japan’s Earthquake and Tsunami Relief Fund.
Reich’s family includes her husband, Dan Allen Reich, a retired veteran; her son Henry, a regional project director at Leggett and Plat; her daughter Setsuko, a production manager at Lending Tree; and three grandchildren.
This year marks the 30th anniversary of Kansenkai under Reich’s leadership. Today, she continues to preserve and cultivate Okinawan traditional dances for future generations. Recently, her younger students have earned their Shinjinsho (Newcomer’s Achievement Ranking), Yushusho (Achievement of Excellence Ranking), and  Saikosho (Achievement of Superiority Ranking) at the Okinawan Prefecture Contest, as well as their teacher’s license.

Congratulations to Keiko Yonamine Reich, a local master/shihan and instructor of traditional Ryukyu dance, who has been honored as one of the Downtown JACL’s Women of the Year 2014!

Photo by Yukikazu Nagashima, Okinawa Association of America in Gardena, California

BIOGRAPHY [via Rafu Shimpo]:

Keiko Yonamine Reich, the headmaster of the Kansenkai, was born on July 27, 1944, in Kin-Cho, Okinawa. In 1963, she graduated from Ginoza High School, where she was on the basketball team. After graduation, she worked as a bookkeeper in a restaurant business.

In 1972, Reich began to learn Okinawan dance from Grandmaster Iemoto Shizu Ikehara, head of the Tamagusuku-Ryu Kansenkai (formerly named Gyokusenkai). Reich participated in Ikehara’s dance recitals and at various community events as a way to develop and promote Kansenkai.

In 1982, Reich enrolled at the Kyoto Kimono Gakuin, where she earned her first- and second-class teacher’s licenses and became a teacher’s assistant.

In December of 1984, Reich’s military husband was transferred to the United States, so her family moved to Oceanside, where she opened her first dance studio. At her students’ request, Reich opened a second studio in Orange County and a third studio in Tuscon, Ariz.

In 1984, Reich became a member of the Okinawan Association of America and of Geinobu. At this time, she also began to participate in numerous events at UC San Diego, CSU Sacramento, Logan University in Utah, Washington State University, the Norris Theater’s Japanese Festival, the Morikami Garden Japanese Cultural Festival in Florida, the Hawaiian Okinawan Festival, and so on. Through her participation in these various events, she was able to introduce the Okinawan culture to many places by collaborating with local dance teachers and performing in their dance recitals.

In 1987, Reich became one of the founding members of the Geinobu Performing Arts. From 1998 to 1999, she served as Geinobu’s chairperson, and she is currently the group’s advisor.

In 1990, Reich received her teacher’s license from Iemoto Ikehara. In 2004, she received her shihan master’s license.

In 1992, she invited her iemoto from Okinawa to her first performance, “Furusato e no Hitotoki,” at the Ebell Theatre in Los Angeles. In September of 1997, she performed at the first Kansenkai Charity Show in Oceanside for San Diego Children’s Hospital. In October of 1997, she performed at the second Kansenkai Charity Show at the Orange County Church for Orange County Children’s Hospital. In August of 2010, Kansenkai performed in a charity show at Oceanside.

Reich donated all of her proceeds to Japan’s Earthquake and Tsunami Relief Fund.

Reich’s family includes her husband, Dan Allen Reich, a retired veteran; her son Henry, a regional project director at Leggett and Plat; her daughter Setsuko, a production manager at Lending Tree; and three grandchildren.

This year marks the 30th anniversary of Kansenkai under Reich’s leadership. Today, she continues to preserve and cultivate Okinawan traditional dances for future generations. Recently, her younger students have earned their Shinjinsho (Newcomer’s Achievement Ranking), Yushusho (Achievement of Excellence Ranking), and  Saikosho (Achievement of Superiority Ranking) at the Okinawan Prefecture Contest, as well as their teacher’s license.

Photoset

(via Japanese American National Museum):

A Day in the Life of Asian Pacific America

The Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center + Flickr present 

A Day in the Life of Asian Pacific America 

Somewhere in 
Asian Pacific America,
child cries; 
father cooks breakfast; 
mother dresses and goes to work
A thousand tasks get done. 
A thousand dreams are born. 

A Day in the Life of Asian Pacific America seeks to capture the particulars of everyday life and piece them together to compose the ultimate wide shot. By looking at life from multiple angles, curated from the visual documentation of amateur photographers and videographers as well as professional documentarians and photojournalists, we can reveal the bigger picture. Through this online exhibit hosted by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center (APAC) atapa.si.edu, we celebrate our common joys, empathize with our sorrows, and appreciate all that we mean to each another. 

We are asking thousands of people to take photographs and shoot video about Asian Pacific American life on May 10, 2014. We chose this date because it falls on the 145th anniversary of the Golden Spike ceremony that marked the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad. This historical joining of the continent was marked with a photograph that excluded the Chinese workers who were critical to the building of the railroad and the industrial modernization of America. 

ONCE ERASED FROM HISTORICAL CONSCIOUSNESS, ASIAN PACIFIC AMERICANS ARE NOW VISIBLE IN PROFOUND WAYS. 

We are seeking professional and amateur photojournalists and filmmakers of all ages and backgrounds to contribute submissions to the online exhibit. 

LET’S DOCUMENT ASIAN PACIFIC AMERICAN LIFE. 

Check here for more details! 

HERE’S HOW YOU CAN BE PART OF THIS EXHIBITION. 

1. Request an invitation to the SMITHSONIAN APAC: A DAY IN THE LIFE Flickr group by sending an email to life@smithsonianapa.org. Please send the email via your registered Flickr email address, or include your Flickr username in the email. Please also include your full name, and location you plan to be* on May 10, 2014 (the day of content capture). You will receive your invitation to the group by May 1, 2014. 

2. Take your photographs and/or videos on May 10, 2014. Content must be captured between12am and 11:59pm on your current timezone. You may submit up to 5 photos OR up to 5 videos with a total runtime of 3 minutes. This exhibition is based on global Asian Pacific American experiences. Although you do not have to identify as Asian Pacific American or be located in the United States, please keep your content consistent with the exhibition theme. 

3. Upload the photographs or video to the Flickr group by 11:59pm EST on May 14, 2014. Please provide a short biographical statement and your contact information. The works you submit may be used by the Smithsonian for the exhibition, publicity purposes and an e-book. All photos or videos selected for the project will credit the contributing artist. 

A group of curators will select and assemble the exhibit by May 26, 2014. The exhibit will be available online at apa.si.edu, with all qualified submissions available for public view via the Flickr group. 

Please tell your friends about “A Day in the Life of Asian Pacific America” and join us today. Your work is an important part of sharing the diversity of APA life with the world. 

For more information about the project, contact Eddie Wong, guest curator, at eddieoak@att.net and Adriel Luis, Curator of Digital and Emerging Media at LuisA@si.edu

*Planned location is for curatorial survey purposes. You will not be bound to that location should your plans change.


Photo credits: Pete Pin, Julie Thi Underhill, Nā‘ālehu Anthony
Link

Sounds fun! :)

"Every day, once a day, give yourself a present. Don’t plan it, don’t wait for it, just… let it happen. Could be a new shirt at the men’s store, a catnap in your office chair, or two cups of good, hot, black coffee."

- Special Agent Dale Cooper

Tags: 100happydays
Photo
Our collection (April 2014)

Our collection (April 2014)

Video

[currently learning]:
汗水節 / Ashimiji Bushi
Written by Minoru Nakamoto and Miyara Nagatsutsumi (1928)

Live version performed by Masae Nakata

Video

[via Angry Asian Man]:

Myx TV just dropped the trailer for its latest original series, I’m Asian American and…, a new documentary series focusing the diverse Asian American diaspora, following unique and sometimes controversial individuals who don’t fit the “model minority” stereotype. If this sounds familiar, I posted a casting call this series last year.

Shot in and around Los Angeles, the series consists of ten episodes, each featuring real people challenging stereotypes about Asian Americans in their everyday lives, from a lawyer who fights human trafficking to a living doll; a dog nanny, a big-time radio DJ, a triplet whose siblings have autism, and more.

The show premieres April 23 on Myx TV.

Link

April 9, 2014 12:48am

The mayor of Nago in Okinawa Prefecture said Wednesday he will visit the United States in May to state his opposition to a Japan-U.S. agreement to relocate a U.S. military base to the Henoko district of his city.

Susumu Inamine also criticized the Japanese government for pressing ahead with the relocation plan even after he won re-election as Nago mayor in January after campaigning against the base.

"Going ahead against the willingness of residents runs counter to democracy," he said at a press conference.

The Japanese and U.S. governments have agreed to relocate the Futenma Marine Corps Air Station to Henoko.

Inamine plans to meet with U.S. government officials, lawmakers and think tank researchers to directly convey his opposition to them during the coming U.S. visit expected for May 18-24, Nago municipal officials said. He made a U.S. trip for the same purpose in February 2012.

[source]

Photoset

Upcoming Uchinaanchu (Okinawan) events in Los Angeles:

**********
OAA KARAOKE CLUB
This Saturday, April 19, 6:00 ~ 9:00 PM
Okinawa Association of America (Yamauchi Building) in Gardena

**********
FEATURING RYUKYU MUSIC (SANSHIN)
Fujimatsuri Bazaar
Saturday, May 3, 12:30 PM
Gardena Buddhist Church in Gardena
- Featuring Choichi Kai Los Angeles (sanshin group)
- There will be Japanese performances and food all day
https://www.facebook.com/events/1405459796394157

**********
OAA UCHINAAGUCHI CLASS WITH SPECIAL LECTURE
Friday, May 9, 7:00 PM
Okinawa Association of America (Room 103) in Gardena
- Featuring a special presentation by Robert Walker, author of “Okinawa and the Ryukyu Islands: The First Comprehensive Guide to the Entire Ryukyu Island Chain”

**********
FEATURING RYUKYU DANCE & TAIKO
Torrance Bunka-Sai
Sunday, April 27, 12:30 PM
Ken Miller Recreation Center in Torrance
- Featuring Ryukyukoku Matsuri Daiko - Los Angeles and Miyagi-Ryu Nosho-Kai Miyagi Nosho Ryubu Kenkyusho (Ryukyu dance)
- There will be Japanese performances and workshops all-day Saturday and Sunday
https://www.facebook.com/events/232948260231147

**********
RYUKYU MUSIC & DANCE RECITAL
Okinawa Association of America’s Minyo no Yuube (An Evening of Minyo)
Sunday, May 18, 1:00 ~ 4:00 PM
Japanese-American Cultural Center of Vista in Vista (Oceanside area)
https://www.facebook.com/events/597959433618183

**********
OKINAWA ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA
ANNUAL PICNIC & OKINAWAN BON DANCE
Sunday, July 13, 11AM ~ 4PM (VOLUNTEERS NEEDED)
Whittier Narrows Recreational Park in South El Monte
- Featuring performances from many local Uchinaanchu, high school scholarship awards, tug-o-war, and Okinawa Bon Odori
https://www.facebook.com/events/496214450500246

Photo
fuckyeahstvincent:

Kim Gordon, Joan Jett, St. Vincent and Lorde backstage at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction ceremony at Brooklyn’s Barclays Center

Based on the fan-recorded videos on YouTube, they were all awesome (especially St. Vincent’s “Lithium” and Lorde’s “All Apologies”)! Hope to see professional recordings soon…

fuckyeahstvincent:

Kim Gordon, Joan Jett, St. Vincent and Lorde backstage at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction ceremony at Brooklyn’s Barclays Center

Based on the fan-recorded videos on YouTube, they were all awesome (especially St. Vincent’s “Lithium” and Lorde’s “All Apologies”)! Hope to see professional recordings soon…

(via surback)